This was a rare game where my play resulted in zero inaccuracies, zero mistakes, and zero blunders. LisaSchess(1503) vs Richiwalt(1376) Computer analysis FEN & PGN LisaSchess (1503) 1 Inaccuracies 0 Mistakes 1 Blunders 30 Average centipawn loss richiwalt (1376) 0 Inaccuracies 0 Mistakes 0 Blunders 8 Average centipawn lossRead More →

I have been highly motivated to carefully think through this question. In recent discussions, I have heard various people make statements like: The New Testament text can not be trusted as it has been heavily manipulated down through time. On the surface, this seems highly possible. However, with a little research, we find solid evidence to the contrary (both external evidence, and internal evidence).Read More →

If I close my eyes and concentrate, I can travel back to 1979 – the year I was first exposed to an exciting new game where unique pieces were moved around on a checkerboard. The game was called chess.Read More →

FM Alisa Melekhina discusses three of her favorite c2 Sicilian games that were all won within 21 moves. This post is a result of translating her YouTube video into an article to demonstrate the strategy of the games for further analysis, in a move-by-move fashion. (She went really fast in her YouTube video … and even skipped over some of her moves.) I am thinking about turing this article into a series of c3 Sicilian game studies. Here, we look at game one.Read More →

The image appearing in this article has been reduced in size to fit into the column’s width – greatly reducing the detail of the writing sample. You may see this work in it’s full glory by clicking directly on the image, and then clicking the (+) button that appears within your browser. May take a few seconds to download, but it’s worth seeing the full details of the work.Read More →

House of Chess will attempt to use the following four images in the rolling Gallery below (and perhaps the banner image of this article) to color-match replacements for two of my “White” chess pieces – the White King and the White Castle. There are actually pieces from three different sets below. You can see brighter white pawns to the right and left sides (from two more-recent sets) against this aged set’s pieces in the center and in the background. The middle pieces (and background pieces) are from a 4″ Monarch Staunton Style set – natural Rosewood and Boxwood. As you can see from the photographs,Read More →